Facing Changes an exhibition in conjunction with Saving Faces Charity.

Expressionless

This is my commissioned artwork for the Faces exhibition organised by the King’s Oral and Maxillofacial Society and Saving Faces.  The brief for the commission was to explore the links between the features of the human face and the way personality can be read into them, and how our facial features shape our identity.

Facing Changes is a collaboration between King’s Oral and Maxillofacial Society and Saving Faces. It aims to bring attention and support to the work carried out by Saving Faces.

This is achieved through multimedia pieces executed by professionals in art, medicine, and science. The work offers a fresh insight into the plane by which we interact with the world and a key to our aesthetic identity: the human face.

The exhibition is a year-long touring exhibition starting at the Red Gate Gallery , before moving on to the Gordon Pathology Museum at Guy’s Hospital and after that it tours various sites in and around the Guy’s and St Thomas’ Hospitals.

 

Private View at the Red Gate Gallery: Friday 18th of February 2011 – 6.00 pm to 11.00 pm, will be an evening of art appreciation with live music African Asian fusion canapés at the gallery 

Tickets: £7.50  www.wegottickets.com

Exhibition runs from: Friday 18th of February – Thursday 24th of February 2011

Gallery Opening Hours: Mon, Tues, Wed, Fri: 11.00 am to 6.30 pm – Sat: 12.30pm – 5.00 pm

Last day of Exhibition: Thursday 24th of February: 10.00am to 5.00pm 

From the Saving Faces website….

“The face is the only part of our body we cannot hide. It conveys our emotions and innermost feelings. We often judge each other on the basis of facial appearance, making assumptions on a whole range of issues.

People suffer the consequences of facial diseases, injuries and disfigurement every day. In the United Kingdom alone 4,700 people develop oral cancer every year and 1,700 people die from this kind of cancer. Around 125,000 young people sustain serious facial injuries and 15,000 people receive treatment for facial disfigurement. Despite the severity of these issues, this remains a much neglected research area leaving thousands of  those unfortunate enough to be affected with little hope for the future. Not enough is known about facial disease, injury and deformity, their psychological and emotional impact and, critically, which treatments are most effective.The Facial Surgery Research Foundation – Saving Faces, is the only charity in the United Kingdom solely dedicated to the worldwide reduction of facial injuries and diseases. We are taking the lead in education and research to improve the physical and psychological treatment of all victims of oral cancer and other facial diseases.”

 

________________________________________

 

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *